Nov
29

This week’s sponsor: O’REILLY DESIGN CONFERENCE

Source: A List Apart

O’REILLY DESIGN CONFERENCE – get the skills and insights you need to design the products of the future. Save 20% with code ALIST


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Nov
22

Common Problems UX Leaders Encounter

Source: UXMatters – <p class="author">By <a href="http://www.uxmatters.com/authors/archives/2006/03/janet_m_six.php">Janet M. Six</a></p>

<p>In this edition of <em>Ask UXmatters</em>, our expert panel discusses common problems that UX leaders face within organizations and offer some ways to overcome them. These organizational issues include the following:</p>
<ul>
<li>failing to understand the unique, strategic value—the <em>business</em> value—of User Experience</li>
<li>not investing adequately in User Experience</li>
<li>lacking an understanding of User Experience and its vocabulary</li>
<li>failing to create a business context in which User Experience can succeed—whether because of an organization’s less than optimal structure, misunderstandings or a lack of respect between people in different functions, resistance to change, or a lack of appreciation for the unique value UX professionals provide</li>
<li>considering User Experience too late in the development process</li>
<li>placing pressure on UX professionals to skip essential steps in the design process</li>
</ul>
<p class="quotation">Every month, our <em>Ask UXmatters</em> experts answer our
readers’ questions about user experience matters. To read their answers to your question in an upcoming
edition of <em>Ask UXmatters</em>, just send your question to us at: <a href="mailto:ask.uxmatters@uxmatters.com">ask.uxmatters@uxmatters.com</a>. <a href="http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2016/11/common-problems-ux-leaders-encounter.php" class="read_more_link">Read More</a></p>
Common Problems UX Leaders Encounter

Nov
22

Agile Development Is No Excuse for Shoddy UX Research

Source: UXMatters – <p class="author">By <a href="http://www.uxmatters.com/authors/archives/2016/09/atul_handa.php">Atul Handa</a> and <a href="http://www.uxmatters.com/authors/archives/2016/09/kanupriya_vashisht.php">Kanupriya Vashisht</a></p>

<p>Agile development and UX design are like a couple in an arranged marriage—a relationship between two strangers who are expected to coexist, develop trust and respect, and eventually, love each other. Throw UX research into the mix and you have the makings of an even more awkward alliance, as you can see in this typical conversation between a UX designer and a product owner, somewhere in the middle of Sprint 0:</p>
<div class="content-box">
<p><span class="run-in-head">Product owner:</span> “Hey Jen, when can we see some wireframes?”</p>
<p><span class="run-in-head">UX designer:</span> “Well, we’re wrapping up our user interviews and putting together some personas—basically trying to get more clarity around our target users. We’ve already started on some sketches, but I expect we’ll need to make some tweaks based on what we learn.”</p>
<p><span class="run-in-head">Product owner:</span> “That’s all very good. But we can’t afford the luxury of spending too much time on research. Sprint 0 ends next week. We can’t keep the developers waiting! Let’s speed things up. I’d really appreciate if you could get those wireframes going quickly?” <a href="http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2016/11/agile-development-is-no-excuse-for-shoddy-ux-research.php" class="read_more_link">Read More</a></p>
Agile Development Is No Excuse for Shoddy UX Research

Nov
22

Where Do Killer Ideas Come From? Value Loops and UX Design Strategy

Source: UXMatters – <p class="author">By <a href="http://www.uxmatters.com/authors/archives/2016/11/david_service.php">David Service</a></p>

<p>In UX and CX design, we’re all looking for the next killer idea—a project that could catapult our company and our career into the spotlight and, potentially, enable us to make a difference to a massive body of users. For many in UX design, such ideas seem almost mythical. How can you find your killer idea? How can you choose which projects to work on?</p>
<p class="sub-p">The anatomy of a great idea is actually quite simple. In this article, I’ll describe what makes a great idea and how they work. <a href="http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2016/11/where-do-killer-ideas-come-from-value-loops-and-ux-design-strategy.php" class="read_more_link">Read More</a></p>
Where Do Killer Ideas Come From? Value Loops and UX Design Strategy

Nov
22

The Conundrum of Humdrum Innovation

Source: UXMatters – <p class="author">By <a href="http://www.uxmatters.com/authors/archives/2016/11/jason_brush.php">Jason Brush</a></p>

<p>Imagine how user interfaces and interactions might look and feel in a future when we all have e-ink wallpaper, short-throw projectors that are mounted all around us, augmented-reality devices; and ubiquitous, cloud-based artificial intelligence (AI).</p>
<p class="sub-p">My company was asked to do just that—to develop a new user-interface aesthetic for a venerable consumer electronics brand to roll out in 2020. Needless to say, we were thrilled. This is exactly the sort of design challenge for which my students at Art Center are in training and, I assume, hope to work on in the real world. But, for most working interaction designers, this sort of open-ended brief is rare and, accordingly, highly coveted.</p>
<p class="sub-p">Today, when a designer receives a brief like this, it is quite different from the past, when designers were asked to imagine the future. Then, designers had to stretch their imagination and free themselves of assumptions about what was and wasn’t feasible to conceive of something new. But, today, the gap between the fantastical world of imagined movie interfaces and what we have in our homes, can fit in our pockets, or strap on our wrists seems to be shrinking by the minute. Recently, when Mark Zuckerberg casually posted about his project to build an AI for his home “like Jarvis in Iron Man,” that sounded completely normal. <a href="http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2016/11/the-conundrum-of-humdrum-innovation.php" class="read_more_link">Read More</a></p>
The Conundrum of Humdrum Innovation

Nov
22

Build Better Products

Source: UXMatters – <p class="author">By <a href="http://www.uxmatters.com/authors/archives/2016/11/laura_klein.php">Laura Klein</a></p>

<p class="quotation">This is a sample chapter from Laura Klein’s new book <em>Build Better Products: A Modern Approach to Building Successful User-Centered Products</em>. 2016 Rosenfeld Media.</p>
<h4>Chapter 11: Measure Better</h4>
<p><img src="http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2016/11/images/BuildBetterProductsCover.png" alt="Build Better Products Cover" width="235" height="370" class="book-image-float-right" />Teams get rewarded based on whether they’ve shipped features on time and on budget for a very good reason—it’s easy to measure. It’s trivial to track things like how many new features are in the latest release or whether version 2.0 was shipped when it was promised.</p>
<p class="sub-p">Sometimes companies make a small effort to tie reviews to real performance. They’ll do it by giving everybody a bonus if the company makes its third-quarter revenue targets or if their division meets a certain large goal for releasing a new product.</p>
<p class="sub-p">Unfortunately, both of these tactics are useless for understanding whether or not a team’s work has made a product better for users. <a href="http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2016/11/build-better-products.php" class="read_more_link">Read More</a></p>
Build Better Products

Nov
22

Insisting on Core Development Principles

Source: A List Apart

The web community talks a lot about best practices in design and development: methodologies that are key to reaching and retaining users, considerate design habits, and areas that we as a community should focus on.

But let’s be honest—there are a lot of areas to focus on. We need to put users first, content first, and mobile first. We need to design for accessibility, performance, and empathy. We need to tune and test our work across many devices and browsers. Our content needs to grab user attention, speak inclusively, and employ appropriate keywords for SEO optimization. We should write semantic markup and comment our code for the developers who come after us.

Along with the web landscape, the expectations for our work have matured significantly over the last couple of decades. It’s a lot to keep track of, whether you’ve been working on the web for 20 years or only 20 months.

If those expectations feel daunting to those of us who live and breathe web development every day, imagine how foreign all of these concepts are for the clients who hire us to build a site or an app. They rely on us to be the experts who prioritize these best practices. But time and again, we fail our clients.

I’ve been working closely with development vendor partners and other industry professionals for a number of years. As I speak with development shops and ask about their code standards, workflows, and methods for maintaining consistency and best practices across distributed development teams, I’m continually astonished to hear that often, most of the best practices I listed in the first paragraph are not part of any development project unless the client specifically asks for them.

Think about that.

Development shops are relying on the communications team at a finance agency to know that they should request their code be optimized for performance or accessibility. I’m going to go out on a limb here and say that shouldn’t be the client’s job. We’re the experts; we understand web strategy and best practices—and it’s time we act like it. It’s time for us to stop talking about each of these principles in a blue-sky way and start implementing them as our core practices. Every time. By default.

Whether you work in an internal dev shop or for outside clients, you likely have clients whose focus is on achieving business goals. Clients come to you, the technical expert, to help them achieve their business goals in the best possible way. They may know a bit of web jargon that they can use to get the conversation started, but often they will focus on the superficial elements of the project. Just about every client will worry more about their hero images and color palette than about any other piece of their project. That’s not going to change. That’s okay. It’s okay because they are not the web experts. That’s not their job. That’s your job.

If I want to build a house, I’m going to hire experts to design and build that house. I will have to rely on architects, builders, and contractors to know what material to use for the foundation, where to construct load-bearing walls, and where to put the plumbing and electricity. I don’t know the building codes and requirements to ensure that my house will withstand a storm. I don’t even know what questions I would need to ask to find out. I need to rely on experts to design and build a structure that won’t fall down—and then I’ll spend my time picking out paint colors and finding a rug to tie the room together.

This analogy applies perfectly to web professionals. When our clients hire us, they count on us to architect something stable that meets industry standards and best practices. Our business clients won’t know what questions to ask or how to look into the code to confirm that it adheres to best practices. It’s up to us as web professionals to uphold design and development principles that will have a strong impact on the final product, yet are invisible to our clients. It’s those elements that our clients expect us to prioritize, and they don’t even know it. Just as we rely on architects and builders to construct houses on a solid foundation with a firm structure, so should we design our sites on a solid foundation of code.

If our work doesn’t follow these principles by default, we fail our clients

So what do we prioritize, and how do we get there? If everything is critical, then nothing is. While our clients concentrate on colors and images (and, if we’re lucky, content), we need to concentrate on building a solid foundation that will deliver that content to end users beautifully, reliably, and efficiently. How should we go about developing that solid foundation? Our best bet is to prioritize a foundation of code that will help our message reach the broadest audience, across the majority of use cases. To get to the crux of a user-first development philosophy, we need to find the principles that have the most impact, but aren’t yet implicit in our process.

At a minimum, all code written for general audiences should be:

  • responsive
  • accessible
  • performant

More specifically, it’s not enough to pay lip service to those catch phrases to present yourself as a “serious” dev shop and stop there. Our responsive designs shouldn’t simply adjust the flow and size of elements depending on device width—they also need to consider loading different image sizes and background variants based on device needs. Accessible coding standards should be based on the more recent WCAG 2.0 (Level AA) standards, with the understanding that coding for universal access benefits all users, not just a small percentage (coupled with the understanding that companies whose sites don’t meet those standards are being sued for noncompliance). Performance optimization should think about how image sizes, scripts, and caching can improve page-load speed and decrease the total file size downloaded in every interaction.

Do each of these take time? Sure they do. Development teams may even need additional training, and large teams will need to be prescriptive about how that can be integrated into established workflows. But the more these principles are built into the core functions of all of our products, the less time they will take, and the better all of our services will be.

How do we get there?

In the long run, we need to adjust our workflows so that both front-end and backend developers build these best practices into their default coding processes and methodologies. They should be part of our company cultures, our interview screenings, our value statements, our QA testing scripts, and our code validations. Just like no one would think of building a website layout using tables and 1px spacer images anymore (shout out to all the old-school webmasters out there), we should reach a point where it’s laughable to think of designing a fixed-width website, or creating an image upload prompt without an alt text field.

If you’re a freelance developer or a small agency, this change in philosophy or focus should be easier to achieve than if you are part of a larger agency. As with any time you and your team expand and mature your skillsets, you will want to evaluate how many extra hours you need to build into the initial learning curves of new practices. But again, each of these principles becomes faster and easier to achieve once they’re built into the workflow.

There is a wealth of books, blogs, checklists, and how-tos you can turn to for reference on designing responsively, making sites accessible, and tuning for performance. Existing responsive frameworks can act as a starting point for responsive development. After developing the overarching layout and flow, the main speed bumps for responsive content arise in the treatment of tables, images, and multimedia elements. You will need to plan to review and think through how your layouts will be presented at different breakpoints. A tool like embedresponsively.com can speed the process for external content embeds.

Many accessibility gaps can be filled by using semantic markup instead of making every element a div or a span. None of the accessible code requirements should be time hogs once a developer becomes familiar with them. The a11y Project’s Web Accessibility Checklist provides an easy way for front-end developers to review their overall code style and learn how to adjust it to be more accessible by default. In fact, writing truly semantic markup should speed CSS design time when it’s easier to target the elements you’re truly focused on.

The more you focus on meeting each of these principles in the early stages of new projects, the faster they will become your default way of developing, and the time spent on them will become a default part of the process.

Maintaining focus

It’s one thing to tell your team that you want all the code they develop to be responsive, accessible, and performant. It’s another thing entirely to make sure it gets there. Whether you’re a solo developer or manage a team of developers, you will need systems in place to maintain focus. Make sure your developers have the knowledge required to implement the code and techniques that address these needs, and supplement with training when they don’t.

Write value statements. Post lists. Ask at every stage what can be added to the process to make sure these core principles are considered. When you hire new talent, you can add questions into the interview process to make sure your new team members are already up to speed and have the same values and commitment to quality from day one.

Include checkpoints within each stage of the design and development process to ensure your work continues to build toward a fully responsive, accessible, and performant end product. For example, you can adjust the design process to start with mobile wireframes to change team mindsets away from designing for desktop and then trying to backfill mobile and tablet layouts. Another checkpoint should be added when determining color palettes to test foreground and background color sets for accessible color contrast. Add in a step to run image files through a compressor before uploading any graphic assets. Ask designers to use webfonts responsibly, not reflexively. Set a performance budget, and build in steps for performance checks along the way. Soon, your team will simply “know” which features or practices tend to be performance hogs and which are lean. You will need to make sure testing and code reviews look for these things, too.

Nothing worth doing happens by accident. Every time we overlook our responsibilities as designers and developers because it’s faster to cut corners, our products suffer and our industry as a whole suffers. As web professionals, how we work and what we prioritize when no one’s looking make a difference in thousands of little ways to thousands of people we will never meet. Remember that. Our clients and our users are counting on us.

 


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Nov
17

The Coming Revolution in Email Design

Source: A List Apart

Email, the web’s much maligned little cousin, is in the midst of a revolution—one that will change not only how designers and developers build HTML email campaigns, but also the way in which subscribers interact with those campaigns.

Despite the slowness of email client vendors to update their rendering engines, email designers are developing new ways of bringing commonplace techniques on the web to the inbox. Effects like animation and interactivity are increasingly used by developers to pull off campaigns once thought impossible. And, for anyone coming from the world of the web, there are more tools, templates, and frameworks than ever to make that transition as smooth as possible. For seasoned email developers, these tools can decrease email production times and increase the reliability and efficacy of email campaigns.

Perhaps more importantly, the email industry itself is in a state of reinvention. For the first time, email client vendors—traditionally hesitant to update or change their rendering engines—are listening to the concerns of email professionals. While progress is likely to be slow, there is finally hope for improved support for HTML and CSS in the inbox.

Although some problems still need to be addressed, there has never been a better time to take email seriously. For a channel that nearly every business uses, and that most consumers can’t live without, these changes signal an important shift in a thriving industry—one that designers, developers, and strategists for the web should start paying attention to.

Let’s look at how these changes are manifesting themselves.

The web comes to email

It’s an old saw that email design is stuck in the past. For the longest time, developers have been forced to revisit coding techniques that were dated even back in the early 2000s if they wanted to build an HTML email campaign. Locked into table-based layouts and reliant on inline styles, most developers refused to believe that email could do anything more than look serviceable and deliver some basic content to subscribers.

For a few email developers, though, frustrating constraints became inspiring challenges and the catalyst for a variety of paradigm-shifting techniques.

When I last wrote about email for A List Apart, most people were just discovering responsive email design. Practices that were common on the web—the use of fluid grids, fluid images, and media queries—were still brand new to the world of email marketing. However, the limitations of some email clients forced developers to completely rethink responsive email.

Until recently, Gmail refused to support media queries (and most embedded styles), leaving well-designed, responsive campaigns looking disastrous in mobile Gmail apps. While their recently announced update to support responsive emails is a huge step forward for the community, the pioneering efforts of frustrated email developers shouldn’t go unnoticed.

Building on the work first introduced by MailChimp’s Fabio Carneiro, people like Mike Ragan and Nicole Merlin developed a set of techniques typically called hybrid coding. Instead of relying on media queries to trigger states, hybrid emails are fluid by default, leaving behind fixed pixels for percentage-based tables. These fluid tables are then constrained to appropriate sizes on desktop with the CSS max-width property and conditional ghost tables for Microsoft Outlook, which doesn’t support max-width. Combined with Julie Ng’s responsive-by-default images, hybrid coding is an effective way for email developers to build campaigns that work well across nearly every popular email client.

<img alt="" src="" width="600" style="display: block; width: 100%; max-width: 100%; min-width: 100px; font-family: sans-serif; color: #000000; font-size: 24px; border="0";" />

Responsive-by-default images with HTML attributes and inline CSS.

More recently, two other methods have emerged that address the issues with mobile email using more advanced techniques. Both Rémi Parmentier’s Fab Four technique and Stig Morten Myre’s mobile-first approach take the concept of mobile-first development so common on the web and apply it to email. Instead of relying on percentage-based fluid tables, both techniques take advantage of the CSS calc function to determine table and table cell widths, allowing for more adaptable emails across a wide range of clients. And, in both cases, developers can largely drop the use of tables in their markup (save for Microsoft ghost tables), creating emails that hew closer to modern web markup.

Moving beyond responsive layouts, email designers are increasingly adding animation and interactivity to their campaigns, creating more engaging experiences for subscribers. Animated GIFs have long been a staple of email design, but CSS animations are becoming more prevalent. Basic transitions and stylistic flourishes like Email Weekly’s heart animation (scroll down) or Nest’s color-shifting background colors are relatively easy to implement, fall back gracefully when not supported, and give email designers more options to surprise and delight their audiences.

Image showing Nest’s keyframe-animation-driven shifting background colors.

Nest’s keyframe-animation-driven shifting background colors. Image courtesy of Nest.

Combined with the checkbox hack and Mark Robbins’s punched card coding, CSS animations allow email developers to create highly interactive experiences for the inbox. While earlier examples of interactivity were reserved for elements like product carousels, people like Robbins and the Rebelmail team have started creating full-blown checkout experiences right in an email.

Image showing the different stages of Rebelmail’s interactive checkout email.

The different stages of Rebelmail’s interactive checkout email. Image courtesy of Rebelmail.

Interactivity doesn’t have to be reserved for viewing retail products, though. At Litmus, animations and interactivity were used to provide a full product tour inside of an email.

Screenshot showing Litmus Buildeer—a code editor built for email design and development.

An interactive product tour in an email. Image courtesy of Litmus.

In this case, interactivity was used to provide product education, allowing users to experience a product before they even got their hands on it. While similar educational effects have been achieved in the past with animated GIFs, the addition of truly interactive elements created an experience that elevated it above similar campaigns.

Finally, the web’s focus on accessibility is cropping up in email, too. Both table-based layouts and inconsistencies in support for semantic elements across email clients have contributed to a near-complete lack of accessibility for email campaigns. Advocates are now speaking out and helping to change the way developers build emails with accessibility in mind.

The use of role=presentation on tables in email is becoming more widespread. By including role=presentation on table elements, screen readers recognize that those tables are used for layout instead of presenting tabular data and skip right to the content of the campaign.

Developers are also embracing semantic elements like proper headings and paragraphs to provide added value for people with visual impairments. So long as you are careful to override default margins on semantic, block-level elements, designers can safely use those elements without worrying about broken layouts. It is now something that every email developer should be doing.

Combined with email’s focus on alternative text—widely used to combat email clients that disable images for security reasons—accessible tables and semantic elements are laying the foundation for more usable, accessible email campaigns. There’s still a huge amount of research and education needed around accessibility in email, but the email world is slowly catching up to that of the web.

All of these techniques, mostly commonplace on the web, are relatively new to the world of HTML email. Somes have been used on a limited scale, but they are on the verge of becoming mainstream. And, while animation and interactivity aren’t appropriate for every email campaign, they are valuable additions to the email toolbox. Taken together, they represent a massive shift in how developers and marketers approach HTML email and are changing the way subscribers think about the humble inbox.

Better tooling

If anything can be considered a constant on the web, it’s that web designers and developers love building tools and frameworks to (in theory) improve their workflows and the reliability of their code. Just like accessibility and interactivity, this focus on tooling and frameworks has been making its way into the email industry over the past few years.

Instead of relying on individual, locally saved, static HTML files, many email developers are now embracing not only GitHub to host and share code, but complete build systems to compile that code, as well. Tools like Grunt and Gulp are now in wider use, as are static site generators like Middleman.

Being able to focus on discrete components means developers no longer have to update multiple HTML files when managing large email programs. For teams in charge of dozens, if not hundreds, of different email templates, this is a godsend. Updating a logo in one place and having it propagate across different campaigns, for example, saves tons of time.

The use of build tools also opens up the possibility of hyperpersonalized campaigns: emails with custom content and custom layouts on a per-subscriber basis. Allowing build systems to handle the compilation of individual modules means that those modules can be pieced together in a virtually unlimited number of ways based on conditions set at the beginning of the build process. This moves personalization in email beyond basic name substitutions and gives email marketers an unbelievably powerful way to connect with subscribers and provide way more value than your typical “batch and blast” campaign.

Likewise, more email developers are relying on preprocessors like Sass and Less to speed up the development workflow. Controlling styles through variables, mixins, and logic can be extremely powerful. While CSS post processors aren’t in wide use, a few savvy email developers are now starting to take advantage of upcoming CSS features in their campaigns.

Email developers and designers working with smaller teams, or those less familiar with advanced tools like preprocessors and build tools, now have a plethora of HTML email templates and frameworks at their disposal. They range in complexity from simple, static HTML files that make customization easy to completely abstracted coding frameworks like MJML and Zurb’s Foundation for Emails 2. Both MJML and Foundation for Emails 2 introduce their own templating languages, allowing email developers to use markup closer to that found on the web, which is then compiled into more complex, table-based HTML.

<mjml>
  <mj-body>
    <mj-container>
      <mj-section>
        <mj-column>
          <mj-text>Hello World!</mj-text>
        </mj-column>
      </mj-section>
    </mj-container>
  </mj-body>
</mjml>

An example of MJML’s templating language, which compiles to table-based markup.

One area that still needs improvement is testing. While tools like Litmus have vastly improved the experience of testing static emails across clients, interactive emails present new challenges. Since testing services currently return static screenshots taken from the inbox, access to devices is crucial for teams working on interactive campaigns. Although a few people are coming up with novel approaches to testing interactive emails (most notably Cyrill Gross’s use of WebKit browsers and clever JavaScript), tooling around interactive email testing will need to improve for more email developers to adopt some of the techniques I describe here.

A seat at the table

Two of the most exciting developments in the email world are the recent Microsoft and Litmus partnership and Gmail’s announcement of support for media queries.

Due to their typically abysmal support for HTML and CSS (especially the box model and floats), the many variations of Outlook have long been the biggest thorn in email developers’ sides. Outlook is the primary reason that emails use tables for layout.

Now, though, for the first time, Microsoft is reaching out to the email community to document bugs and rendering problems in order to guide future development efforts and improve the rendering engines underpinning their email clients. While we’ll still have to rely on tables for the foreseeable future, this is a good indicator that the email community is moving closer to some form of standards, similar to the web in the early 2000s. I don’t think we’ll ever see standards as widely propagated across email clients as they are on the web, but this is the first step toward better HTML and CSS support for email developers.

One likely result of the Microsoft/Litmus partnership is that more email client vendors will open up lines of communication with the email design industry. With any luck, and a lot of work, Microsoft will be the first of many vendors to sit down at the table with email designers, developers, and marketers in order to improve things not only for email professionals, but also for the subscribers we serve. There are already signs that things are getting better beyond Microsoft’s promise to improve.

Gmail, one of the more problematic email clients, recently updated their rendering engine to support display: none;—an unprecedented move from a team that is historically unsympathetic to the concerns of the email community. Email developers were in for an even bigger surprise from the Gmail team when they announced that they will be supporting media queries and embedded styles, too. While the hybrid coding approach mentioned earlier is still useful for addressing some email clients, this change means that it is now easier than ever to apply the principles of responsive web design—fluid grids, fluid images, and media queries—to HTML email campaigns.

Perhaps more interesting is Gmail’s added support for embedded CSS and element, class, and ID selectors. With this one change, embedded styles will be nearly universally supported—meaning that email designers will no longer be bound to inline styles and all the headaches they bring. Emails will now be easier to design, develop, and maintain. The lighter code base and more familiar style of writing CSS means that many of the blockers for web developers taking email seriously will be removed.

Beyond rallying around improved support for HTML and CSS, the email community itself is thriving. I remember the dark days—really only a few years ago—of email design, when it was extraordinarily difficult to find reliable information about how to build email campaigns, let alone connect with others doing the same. Today, people interested in email have a large and growing community to turn to for help. More marketers, designers, and developers are sharing their work and opinions, contributing to a discourse that is helping to shape the industry in new and interesting ways.

Perhaps more importantly, designers and developers are beginning to understand that working with email is a viable career option. Instead of relegating email to one more task as a web dev, many are now taking up the mantle of the full-time email developer.

Now’s the time

Where once there was just darkness and Dreamweaver, the email world is brightening with the light of a growing community, better tools, and amazing techniques to animate a traditionally static medium. And, with the increasing support of email client vendors, we can finally see the flicker of email standards way off on the horizon.

While some folks have expressed emotions ranging from amusement to scorn when discussing email marketing, no one can take it for granted anymore. Subscribers love email, even if you don’t. Email is routinely the most effective digital marketing channel. Companies and teams need to embrace that fact and take email seriously. Fortunately, now’s the perfect time to do that. Never have there been more tools, resources, and people dedicated to making email better.

The revolution in email is bound to be a slow one, but make no mistake: it’s coming. The web is leaking into the inbox. If you can’t keep up, your campaigns (and you) will be left behind.


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Nov
17

This week’s sponsor: ADOBE XD

Source: A List Apart

ADOBE XD BETA, the only all-in-one solution for designing, prototyping, and sharing experiences for websites and mobile apps.


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Nov
14

This week’s sponsor: ADOBE XD

Source: A List Apart

ADOBE XD BETA, the only all-in-one solution for designing, prototyping, and sharing experiences for websites and mobile apps.


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